Should the MilTownKlan Support Obama?

This is an email I sent out to the [MilTownKlan] email list. (I really need to redo that website… 😛 )

Should the MilTownKlan Support Obama?

I’d like as many people to vote on this as quickly as possible. If you’re not interested in this topic please take the time to visit my blog and vote “Uninterested.”

[Click Here to Vote]

Sup guys,

I honestly don’t like Obama or McCain’s policies. I actually think I like a lot of McCain’s policies better. Those of you who have been following my videos for a while know that I highly enjoyed Ron Paul.

Now I’m thinking about supporting Obama and I’ll give you the reasons why:

1. He is an outstanding community organizer (so more people are involved in the whole political process, which is a good thing).

2. I want to learn as much as possible about community organizing. What better way to learn than to participate?

3. I want as many as you as possible to learn the skills needed for community organizing (on and off-line skills).

Quite honestly, even if you’re a McCain supporter I would recommend “supporting” Obama to learn what he’s doing right. The majority of voters don’t live on the Internet like we do. They’re old skool. Reaching them requires a different skill set than reaching people online. It’s an important skill set to have.

I would like to hear your opinion on this matter. The best way to do this would be [leaving a comment on my blog], but feel free to write me back at this email address as well.

peace!

miltownkid

P.S. [Don’t forget to vote/comment on the blog!]

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22 Responses to Should the MilTownKlan Support Obama?

  1. Dave says:

    Yes you should because I’m going to do it! After eight years of the Bush Idiottorship I’m ready for a “change” now!

  2. James Lick says:

    I said no. On the other hand I don’t really support McCain either. McCain may have a rep as a maverick Republican but he looks to me like the typical low-tax/big-spender Republican that’s been sending the US economy south for the last 8 years. At least the Democrats (under Clinton) were honest about spending what was raised instead of just jacking up the debt. But both parties have turned into socialist big spender parties, they just have different ideas on how to spend it and how to raise the money.

    But anyways, I think politics is enough a personal choice that a diverse group like this shouldn’t support a particular candidate but instead discuss fairly the good and bad points about each candidate.

  3. Magdalicious says:

    I do not know enough about either candidate to make a real decision. But I lean towards Obama a little because he seems to have some interesting ideas that vary somewhat from the mold. Unfortunately, I do think that in the end whoever is in office things remain quite the same. It would be the ultimate in interesting if there were a real US president instead of a puppet, even if that mean horrid tyrant at least it would be interesting.

    One great thing Bush did, was enrage people who had no interest in the political process to the point where they took some kind of notice and even in some cases action.

    While I understand what you want to do and even think it a good idea, I have to agree with JLick’s final comment. 🙂

  4. Flex says:

    Palin is hot
    McCain is worse than bush
    Obama has a Muslim background to say the least (and that’s a good thing)

    so Obama wins

  5. Namahottie says:

    This campaign is the Godzilla of campaigns to come during the 21st century. Politics as usual is changing and much of it can be contributed to the success Obama has in galvanizing people. But Obama’s ability to be a community organizer isn’t anything new. Just a borrowed page from Saul Alinsky book. But I digress.

    I’m not much of an Obama supporter because of his middle-of-road politics. He hasn’t and will not take a strong stance on many issues that really have been effected by the current administration. McCain calls himself a reformer but we know that he isn’t going to bite the hand that has feed him for his over 20+ years in Congress. In fact, in one of his so-call past reforms benefit the current administration as well as himself: Campaign Finance Reform-The FEC has no quorum.

    As race becomes more an issue in this election and those with the agenda to use it to knock Obama out, will probably be the decisive factor in me voting for Obama.

  6. froglife says:

    “but he looks to me like the typical low-tax/big-spender Republican that’s been sending the US economy south for the last 8 years”

    actually, McCain’s decision to side with democrats in taxing windfall profits of big oil didn’t make him many friends in the republican party. Neither did his immigration policy, which nearly cost him his candidacy in the early stages of the campaign. In my opinion, he is more along the lines of the old school republicans, i.e. hands-off, take care of yourselves, do your own thing.
    And the mccain/palin ticket seems more interested in market-driven energy reform, as opposed to Obama’s government-driven plan. There is no debate that this country must end its dependence on mideast oil, but capitalists like myself believe that the market will take us there faster than a gov’t program can.

    and lastly, the price of failure for a community organizer is rather less severe than that of a fighter pilot, or a governor for that matter.

    but I’m curious to see what you guys think

  7. froglife says:

    “He hasn’t and will not take a strong stance on many issues that really have been effected by the current administration.”

    one quick example for ya…McCain was a strong supporter of the largely unpopular troop surge in Iraq from day one. Obama was a vocal opponent of the plan. Today, even Obama admits that it was a success. over 80% of the provinces are under Iraqi control, and the central gov’t is pushing for an American withdrawal by 2011 (this is good).

  8. willy donuts says:

    Obama has my support but he isn’t going to a save the nation. McCain and Palin are exactly what Obama called them, a Pig with lipstick. The Palin decision was to get hype back to the GOP. McCain ain’t no maverick neither is Palin.

    You want war, every other nation other than Israel hating us, and oil rigs off our coastlines like floating cities then go ahead vote for McCain.

    At least with will have change, a change in party politics. Who knows maybe he’ll do us some justice in the equal opprotunity field make these idiots rethink about ending affirmative action.

    Shit I rather pay higher taxes knowing that I might be taken care of since I don’t have healthcare or at least kids will be seen.

  9. thomas647 says:

    It actually scares me that Palin could be vice-president of USA. Her comments are bizzare, she has no “proper” experience and any1 who looks as good as her shunt be involved in politics.

    Obama doesnt have mountains of experience, but his views and what he says seems posotive for America.

    Im from the UK and i have been folowing this rather closley because whoever runs America practically run the Uk too….

  10. Niko says:

    Well cant say anything to that, I live in Finland so it’s better if I dont get involved.

  11. willy Donuts says:

    Seriously how did the troop surge work? Less carnage in Iraq? Our police state / martial law worked? No actually everyone went to Afghanistan. This shit is like roaches if you bomb the bottom floor of the duplex, the roaches move up, you bomb up, they move down. Best policy is to move out and let the landlord take care of the issue. So here the best issue would be for us to pack our gear and leave. Go to Afghanistan where they actually want us to assist with the Coalition, and not interfere with local politics and just shut down Taliban operations.

    McCain is an idiot, hands down. How does one expect Cold War politics to play nowadays? Palin is no better either. Again Obama said it best, you negotiate with these Arab/Muslim leaders and ask “How can I help?” instead of dictating your vision on their lives. Doing so all you do is give ammunition to fundamental Islamic groups to take charge of the nation, and that is not a good thing because then you have internal faction fighting (Suni vs. Shitte vs. smaller Islam factions).

  12. willy Donuts says:

    Something you might enjoy.

  13. MakaiOokami says:

    Hey Miltown Kid. I just want to inform you of a few things…

    1. McCain was running on being a Maverick and now he states that he agrees with Bush 90 percent of the time.

    2. The guy is 72 years old. If you vote for McCain you have to think about Palin and if you agree with HER being president. Especially since she thinks shooting wolves is good for the environment from airplanes, that rape victims should have to pay for their own medical examinations, and that abortion should be illegal even if you were raped by your family member (thought I don’t know if she’ll let you abort if it can kill you)

    3. Obama undestands how important the internet can be. That’s why he supports things like net nuetrality and even helped with a bill that made it to where we can use a google like search engine in order to view where our tax dollars are going. The reason why net neutrality is important is do you want to be capped off at 250 or less Gigs of data? Think about your online gaming, video streaming, youtube uploads, etc… and tell me that it would be great to reach your cap 2 times and end up losing internet priveledges. More importantly he wants to protect you from companies that will want you to pay to access different websites. Example… You may have to pay money through your internet provider to get any more internet access than news sites, you may have to pay additional money to go to streaming websites like youtube or ustream.t.v. if these companies get their way.

    4. Ron Paul has some great ideas… McCain is like the guy’s anti-self. McCain supports a war we can’t afford, he is against the civil liberties of our constitution like Pro-choice and no longer talks out against the torture we are using (which he has experienced first hand)

    5. This is the real McCain and i refuse to vote for him. No this isn’t liberal spin. McCain is a fucking lier he is always misrepresenting Obama’s opinion and trying to use propoganda to win this election. He’s discraceful. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IH0xzsogzAk

  14. There is no real difference between McCain and Obama. They both will expand the war and put troops in our streets. Support a third party candidate.

  15. ubrigens says:

    I was in class the other day and the teacher asked everyone to raise their hand if they would vote for mccain and everyone but 2 people raised there hand I was pissed of. O btw my teachers a communist and stupid so knowing her she will probably vote for him. Obama policies are better

  16. Dave says:

    Beware everyone the Reblubercains are up to their dirty tricks again.

  17. froglife says:

    this is for my man willy D.
    “Seriously how did the troop surge work? Less carnage in Iraq? Our police state / martial law worked? No actually everyone went to Afghanistan”

    ..I’m glad you asked. yes, there is significantly less carnage in Iraq. the iraqis are increasingly in control of their own affairs, and a country that was declared by the CIA to be in a state of civil war in 2006 has calmed dramatically. I will concede to you that martial law is a condition of occupation. but if you want some perspective, consider how 1 million allied troops enforced a much more heavy-handed police state on the germans after world war II, yet would you not agree that it was necessary to prevent the return of the Reich?
    so yes, seriously, the troop surge worked, and yes, now that Iraq is cooling off, we can fry bigger fish is afghanistan and (gulp) pakistan.

    “Best policy is to move out and let the landlord take care of the issue. So here the best issue would be for us to pack our gear and leave.”
    keep in mind that the previous landlord was Saddam Hussein, and interim candidates for the job have included guys like Abu Musab al Zarqawi and Muqtada al Sadr. think about what you’re suggesting here…..

    “Go to Afghanistan where they actually want us to assist with the Coalition, and not interfere with local politics and just shut down Taliban operations.”

    the reason ‘local politics’ exist at all is because of the allied invasion to oust the taliban. Before that it was martial law in the extreme; no music, no women driving cars or going to school, no internet, no books other that the koran and the hadith, etc..
    and yes, I agree with you 100% that we should be over there kicking ass. maybe I’ll see you there?

  18. willy Donuts says:

    For froglife:
    I will concede to you that martial law is a condition of occupation. but if you want some perspective, consider how 1 million allied troops enforced a much more heavy-handed police state on the germans after world war II, yet would you not agree that it was necessary to prevent the return of the Reich?

    That was under different circumstances. Let’s see, us assisting in preventing a coalition of countries performing complete genocide of civilians that a few idiots deemed them to be the reason for their countries’ poor economy, or compared to Iraq, us being the sole proprietor in occupying a nation in order to commandeer their oil reserves so that a few elite in our country can profit. Those are two different situations where martial law was necessary as in Iraq it was not.

    keep in mind that the previous landlord was Saddam Hussein, and interim candidates for the job have included guys like Abu Musab al Zarqawi and Muqtada al Sadr. think about what you’re suggesting here…..
    -You’re right Saddam was a slumlord as well, but he kept the peace. We’re not the world sheriff, therefore we have no right to evict people. The citizens themselves could of done this themselves. At least Saddam let be Muslim’s and even the Christian minority had some sort of resolve there. Now with him gone, it’s open season, so what’s worse dealing with one on a diplomatic base or dealing with an unknown number (since our Intel is shitty) fighting for that position and not really giving a damn about collateral damage.

    As for seeing me there, prolly not. I’ve been to Iraq in 2003 on the roll up and I’ve been to Afghanistan (outside of any base or post amidst the chaos). I have a son, and I need to school him on proper morals so when he’s of age he can defend what’s morally right.

  19. froglife says:

    “We’re not the world sheriff, therefore we have no right to evict people. The citizens themselves could of done this themselves….Now with him gone, it’s open season, so what’s worse dealing with one on a diplomatic base or dealing with an unknown number (since our Intel is shitty) fighting for that position and not really giving a damn about collateral damage.”

    i agree. however, the next president will inherit this situation and all the mistakes that were made along the way, and I argue that McCain’s strategy has a higher probability of success than Barak’s. the fact that the government has actually pushed to speed up U.S. withdrawal is a good sign; if they want us out, then we can transfer responsibility to an organic Iraqi govt and avoid leaving them hanging like we did in gulf war I.

    “You’re right Saddam was a slumlord as well, but he kept the peace”
    yeah, the same could be said of joseph stalin. and what about his wars with kuwait, iran, the kurds? whether or not it was our right to evict him, we did, and Saddam was about as diplomatically accessible as Kim Jong Il.

    “I’ve been to Iraq in 2003 on the roll up and I’ve been to Afghanistan (outside of any base or post amidst the chaos). I have a son, and I need to school him on proper morals so when he’s of age he can defend what’s morally right.”
    if you’re ever in milwaukee at the same time as me, I’ll buy you as many beers as you can drink.
    but what do you think about obamanomics, which essentially looks to me like income redistribution? I think his plan places a disproportionate amount of the tax burden on the middle class. thoughts?

  20. willy Donuts says:

    “i agree. however, the next president will inherit this situation and all the mistakes that were made along the way, and I argue that McCain’s strategy has a higher probability of success than Barak’s. the fact that the government has actually pushed to speed up U.S. withdrawal is a good sign; if they want us out, then we can transfer responsibility to an organic Iraqi govt and avoid leaving them hanging like we did in gulf war I.”
    – We should hand over everything to an organic Iraqi infrastructure, but we won’t not until we get a cut of something, because that’s how greedy we are as a nation. As for the problem, that’s one big misconception and a part of our problem as a nation, Iraq isn’t the next President’s issue, its ur issue right now as a nation. The President is just a figure head for us. McCain solution is not better, only better in the sense that if you want war then so be it, but unless you’ve truly been there, I don’t know if you’ve been there or not, but I wouldn’t wish that on my worst enemy.

    As for Obama, I don’t it’s income redistribution plan, I’m for it. Why should the elite keep getting rich by taking advantage of the poor and middle class? While the rest of the nation is struggling, these guys continue to bring in record profits, thats insane. Now if people were just buying a companies product that was reasonably priced then I would against it, but if they’re solely responsible for taking advantage of the people then so be it. It’s no different when gas stations and other businesses price gouge during disaster (look at examples right now during Hurricane Ike, hell here in Florida price went up 40 cents a gallon over night and the oil that we use to fuel our cars are not even affected by this hurricane), so I’m for Obama on this decision. We need to start thinking as a collective, as a people, with compassion and sincerity, and not jump to thinking people made bad choices because they are struggling.

    “yeah, the same could be said of joseph stalin. and what about his wars with kuwait, iran, the kurds? whether or not it was our right to evict him, we did, and Saddam was about as diplomatically accessible as Kim Jong Il.”
    -Saddam wasn’t very diplomatic, but would you be with some nation that is funding your nations rebels and is trying to take a percentage of your GDP? Would you be diplomatic if a nation was telling the world that you had WMDs when you’re too broke to have them? Granted he used the funds for his palaces, but palaces for his ego are a lot better than WMDs. Again we are in the wrong again. And McCain/Palin are definitely not the answer.

    Again for Obamanomics (first I ever heard of this, haha), I don’t think it’ll hurt the middle class, or at least what he is proposing, it sounds like it’s more for the elites (and it should be). Obama is not the answer to America’s problems, and it’s sad people believe this. We should focus a lot of attention on local and state politics as well. Especially since they have a more direct effect on us. For example, people should be taking on this police state that we live in. Granted it’s not right to have someone watching the cops watch us, but some serious state statute regulation needs to happen.

    This is insane, the way they treat all people (you can see numerous examples on youtube). Also America needs to get it’s head out of it’s ass and pay attention, we don’t need politicians who are millionaires to run this country. I rather have some guy who lives next door because they see what I see. They feel the same economic crunch I feel. This nation needs to change, or we are going (if we aren’t there yet) to be a fascist nation one night and people are going to be assed out.

  21. willy Donuts says:

    Froglife, thanks for your comments man/woman. I love conversing here with ya. I respect your ideas, as I am learning something new and different. Thanks a lot.

  22. froglife says:

    back at ya bro. oh, and I’m a dude by the way.
    on Iraq: we seem to agree that turnover is necessary, but disagree on how to achieve it. I think a fundamental mistake was made by ambassador paul bremer during the initial reconstruction after the push: his policy of de-baathification scrapped the entire iraqi infrastructure, so it took a long time to build a new gov’t from scratch. A unilateral pullout before the country could recover would make it easy pickings for unpleasant dudes that thrive in lawless areas of the world. Now that the government is feeling its oats a bit, withdrawal under favorable circumstances looks a lot more realistic. Obama said he would begin removing conventional troops by the thousands, and increase the spec-ops presence. this would leave the specwar guys hanging out like the proverbial dog’s balls while their support network is vastly diminished, and would not promote stability. I think this shows a fundamental lack of understanding on how to use military forces.
    And the war is definitely a presidential issue, because we are essentially electing the guy who dictates our military strategy for the next four years. As for whether or not I agree with the decision to invade in the first place, at this point it’s moot.
    on Obamanomics: if I didn’t know better, I’d think from reading your last post that you were a republican from the early 19oo’s. The aversion to big government is something I definitely can agree with you on. I don’t want to be under a politician’s thumb…if my neighborhood public school sucks, I want my neighborhood to get together and take care of it. That’s why I’m intrigued by the mccain ticket…he seems like an old-school republican (the party was getting a little wacky under the the Bushes) that believes good people need very little governing to thrive. I’m all for taking ownership of our problems at the smallest level rather than relying on the federal government to initiate solutions from the top down. I like the willingness of both mcain and palin to piss off the entrenched right, and I don’t see them as marching us down the road to facism; rather, I think (actually hope) that a mcain presidency would mean much more hands-off federal government.

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